Posts Tagged ‘Twitter’

Social Media empowers Citizen Journalism

Posted on: May 29th, 2012 by admin-kablooey No Comments

After my last article about the role of social media in journalism I received an email through a friend from a journalism lecturer who shared this TED video with me.

The video is a great description of a new layer of journalism that social media has empowered. A form of journalism that places the knowledge of the crowd into the hands of responsible reporters.

This is a great example of how people can use technology in a small way to make a big difference. If enough people were to capture, record and share the happenings of a controversial event then it would be possible to bring accountability into the situation again.

Another example of how transparent our world is becoming and how shared information can be filtered through social networks to generate information from events that have already passed.

The question that sits in the back of my mind is “could a skilled social media journalist be digging deep into the social media archives of your business?”

Social Media empowers Citizen Journalism originally posted on Mike Saunders – Keynote Speaker and Social Media Coach



Does a CEO need to blog?

Posted on: November 30th, 2011 by admin-kablooey 4 Comments

If you were to take one look at the world today, it would be obvious that social media has become a very important communication tool. Ask yourself this question “can a CEO remain relevant if they are not versed in this new communication style the world has adopted?”

More and more social media is changing our consumers and our employees. This change is frightening at times, we recently discovered that younger generations have a total disregard for email communication and prefer to communicate in social and business contexts through social media channels like Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. Even older generations are warming to social media communication with 128 000 new CEO’s joining LinkedIn in South Africa alone.

In general there seems to be a mixed opinion about a CEO having a blog. Some believe it to be something they should only engage in once they have the time to manage it correctly (which may never happen) and others seem uninterested. There is a small group of blogging CEO’s who are embracing this new communication style and using it very effectively to engage with employees and customers.

Think of a blog as a place to drive company vision, address general concerns, highlight great stories about customers and to educate your employees on matters that concern your business.

Zappo’s CEO’s have also used their blog to update employees on the progress of specific projects and achievements. I would like to suggest taking a look at the CEO & COO blog for Zappo’s to see how they have successfully used it to promote and communicate the vision of the business and deal with employee concerns about business changes – especially after the Amazon buy out. This is a great example of effectively using a blog as a business leader.

Blogs can also be used to improve your personal profile by blogging on specialized topics. As a CEO of a social media agency, I use my blog to promote the internet marketing industry I work in and recently Keith Coats used the TomorrowToday’s New World of Work blog to share his directive as a “story telling” CEO. Keith’s article was key to communicating his leadership style to the TomorrowToday team as he took the reigns as CEO.

So if you are planning to start a blog as the CEO of your organisation here are a few tips:

Use you blog to lead by example

Share examples of the type of leadership and work ethic you believe makes your organisation better. Highlight great customer experiences and new product breakthroughs. Don’t be shy to give credit where it is due.

Use your blog to educate and motivate

You can’t educate and motivate each person in your organisation personally but a blog does allow you an increased chance for your employees to hear your vision straight from you. You are also able to share insight into your motivations and by passing these on they usually inspire and motivate others.

Keep your blog personal and authentic

Don’t get your PA to write this for you. It’s value is that its from you. If you are not a strong writer then write the “essence” of the article and a basic structure and let someone edit it for you.

CEO Blogging

Reply to your comments

Replying to comments this will show people you care about your readers and that the opinion you share on your blog is actually yours.

 

To find out more about how to harness social technology in you business please take a look at our presentation “Social Reinvention

20120229-183015.jpg

So what business benefit does Twitter offer its users?

Posted on: November 2nd, 2011 by admin-kablooey No Comments

Twit!

A few years ago this word would have described someone slightly lower on the food chain who annoys us. Today it has evolved into a term of endearment for those people using Twitter to communicate. Yes, it’s true. These people sitting on Twitter all day long are Twits, or Twerps or Tweeps.  Tweeps have found that by using Twitter, they enhance their social life and their ability to learn. They use Twitter as a place to find out and share news, thoughts, insight and opinion about anything they want at any given time.

Twitter is defined as an information network with a social slant. The well-known micro-blogging website started out with the aim to create a portal of the latest information on any topic – an information stream of the latest and current news.

Twitter in BusinessEvan Williams (Wikipedia) puts it best –  “What we have to do is deliver to people the best and freshest most relevant information possible. We think of Twitter as it’s not a social network, but it’s an information network. It tells people what they care about as it is happening in the world.”

The term micro-blogging means to share information in short bite-size pieces. In Twitter, these bite-size pieces are 140 characters and often contain links to the more in-depth article posted on a blog somewhere on the internet. These short bite-size pieces of information are known as tweets. Tweets are the voice of people, or tweep’s, on twitter.

Twitter in South Africa is growing rapidly as we have seen the website move from the seventh most visited website in South Africa in 2010, to sixth position in 2011. This growth shows an increased usage of the network. On a personal note, I have also been noticing an increase in South African users. Currently I have about 6100 followers (twitter.com/mikeasaunders) and 60.2% of them are South African users. I also find that the South African users are the most engaging with each other. Maybe that just because South Africans are fairly patriotic and like to stick together.

That brings me to the next question: What is a follower?

In Twitter you can follow anyone you feel like. Following someone means that you will see what they tweet when you login to your Twitter account. This is different to Facebook. In Facebook you need to request a friendship and that person must accept your friend request before you can see their updates.

On Twitter you follow anyone who adds value to your life by tweeting ‘the good stuff’! You can even follow celebrities if you care about what they are doing on Tuesday afternoon at 1:43pm. I prefer to follow business experts, leadership experts, social media guru’s, marketing mavens and anyone else that can help me grow as an individual.

Acquiring a mass of followers amplifies your voice in the twittersphere and increases your chances of acquiring new followers because your current followers will retweet (echo) your tweets to their followers. Of course your followers will only retweet  the really good stuff. So if you want to build a following, make sure your tweets add value to people’s lives and you should be well on your way to building a great following.

So what business benefit does Twitter offer its users? I would suggest that there are three primary benefits that can be gleaned from Twitter.

    • As a promotional tool
    • As a networking tool
    • As a research tool.

A promotional tool

Looking at Twitter with a business mindset shows us that Twitter becomes a promotional tool. A way to promote the way we think, what and who we find interesting, our blog and our services. The offline equivalent to this would be writing an article for a newspaper or magazine. People who buy the magazine are promoted to through your article.

In the same way, your followers on Twitter are the equivalent of magazine subscribers. Posting tweets then allows you to profile yourself as a professional in your industry by posting original articles, links to interesting websites/articles, service offerings and anything else you may choose.

A networking tool

People on Twitter are very open to networking, especially with people who they respect. Respect on Twitter is primarily attributed to people who produce good quality tweets.

In my personal experience, I have found this to be one of the most valuable aspects of Twitter.  I use Twitter to promote my blog by posting links to articles that I’ve written. In addition I also tweet links to other articles on social media and internet marketing. This creates a useful Twitter profile (www.twitter.com/mikeasaunders) that people interested in internet marketing and social media can follow.

The people following me are interested in social media and internet marketing, meaning that the potential is high that I may have followers that would be interested in hiring me. What I’ve done is create a Twitter account that will attract potential clients as well as industry peers, competitors and business partners.

When people retweet my content, it often opens up an opportunity for conversation and insight otherwise unavailable to me. I always use the opportunity to connect with these people because their interest in my content on Twitter shows a common interest. This often ends up in a physical meetings over coffee if the Twitter conversation proves valuable to both parties.

So, by producing engaging blog content that I promote on Twitter, I find people who are interested in the industry that I operate in. When these people engage with my content (retweeting or replying to tweets), I use the opportunity to engage them further and get to know them better.

A research tool

Twitter search has become a very popular tool to search for specific topics inside Twitter. These search results are continually updated with the latest tweets which means that you can literally find out what someone is saying about you, your company, a competitor or a world event this very minute.

Looking to find out more about Social Media? Why not look into inviting Mike Saunders to your next conference  to present Social Media and it’s uses with in the business context.

Short Study: Generation Y in South Africa

Posted on: March 2nd, 2011 by admin-kablooey 8 Comments

Over the last month Mike Saunders and a few associates ran a small study on Generation Y in South Africa. We interviewed 144 students with an average age of 18 years old. The gender split was 60% female and 40% male.

Generation-Y-in-South-AfricaThe findings were quite interesting and echoed many generalizations about generation Y.

In South Africa, Generation Y uses digital platforms for communication and prefer Facebook and BBM over any other communication tool. Email continues to lose its effectiveness as a communication vehicle with this generation.

Google is starting to lose search market share to Facebook as 50% of Gen Y chooses to use Facebook as a search engine over Google.

Although MXit is popular it’s loyalty is much lower (less than one hour a day) than Facebook (up to five hours per day).

When given the choice Gen Y chose the internet over magazines, their cellphone over the internet and tertiary education over their cell phone. They are also a healthy bunch of individuals choosing healthy food over junk food, restaurants over fast food and bottled water over fizzy drinks.

Click Here for a complete list of some of our findings

Social Media in Sales

Posted on: January 19th, 2011 by admin-kablooey No Comments

Social technologies like twitter, foursquare, MXit, facebook and BBM represent the communication shift from physical to digital. Although this is becoming a well known fact most people are unsure where they stand and how this communication will affect their business.

Most business are completely reliant on strong sales teams who are well equipped with product knowledge and sales resources.
Going into the future I believe that one of those resources is a strong understanding of social media. Let’s get into why:

Social Media in Sales StrategySales is ALL about clear communication

Sales people need to clearly and precisely explain the features, benefits and virtues of a product. More than this they need to explain this in a way that is appreciated by the consumer. Social media will open you up to the communication channel that many young millennial people appreciate.

About a year ago I helped a client take their education product into the world of social media. The client experiences a revolt inside the company as people rejected the idea of ‘getting social’. The results however were outstanding.

Once the sales team was trained and equipped with the tools to communicate effectively we a launched the Facebook page. Within a few days potential students started commenting on the page with questions about the institution. We were quickly able to respond with the sales team and turned over R 250 000, 00 inside six weeks.

This success simply came from the mindset of meeting your market where they are and the tactic of getting ‘trained up!’

– Be sure to read part two of our social media in sales series.

Changing the way I Read

Posted on: January 5th, 2011 by admin-kablooey 2 Comments

For those of you who follow the TomorrowToday blog regularly, you’ll know that one of my interests during 2010 was the shifting landscape of reading. All kinds of reading. Books, Newspapers, Magazines. What we were reading on? How we were going to pay for it? How ‘they’ were going to charge us for it?

I picked up a post on Memeburn this morning called iPad magazines: Not all they’re cut out to be. The thrust of the article centers around the decline in iPad Magazine sales over the last 6 months.

“According to the Audit Bureau of Circulations, which collects magazine circulation data from companies willing to furnish numbers, all iPad magazines have seen fall offs in downloads over the past few months. Wired was averaging 31,000 downloads from July through September, had 22,000 and 23,000 respectively in October and November. Other magazines have seen similar declines: Vanity Fair sold 8,700 downloads of its November issue, down from an average of about 10,500 from August through October; GQ sold 11,000 copies, its worst showing yet.”

The author suggests some possible reasons for the decline from a drop in marketing and hype, to the platform, to the price.

I don’t know about you? But I’m watching my reading change. Right in front of my eyes. Quite literally : ) The changes in my world have been influenced largely by the platform I’m using to do the reading and the apps I find to use. Here’s a quick and recent account of events:

The big change to my reading started with my iPhone and Twitter (SimplyTweet). This combination radically altered how I read. Before this duo arrived my world was all magazines, books and newspapers. All of a sudden I was reading 7-10 articles (posts) a day on my iPhone. Magazines and newspapers disappeared almost completely. Books remained.

A Kindle was added to the mix, but it didn’t change my Twitter reading at all. It was a complimentary addition. Of course paper based reading had now almost vanished from my life.

A few months ago I got an iPad. This has not only sent my iPhone packing, but it’s dramatically shifted where I get my reading material from. From getting almost all my reading from Twitter, I now almost exclusively am making use of RSS feeds. This has to do with the app I found, Early Edition. It’s a lot like Flipboard, but I can’t go back to Flipboard for some reason?

So for now Twitter has disappeared as a source of reading. I still engage with Twitter, but it’s become social and about people and less about the links to great reading. I must confess I miss it, and will find a way to integrate it back into my world.

What I do know is that whether people like it or not, the way we read, what we read on, what we’ll pay for it, when we’ll read…. it’s all going to change. I’m prepared to acknowledge I’m a little on edge, an early-ish adopter even, but when I see what’s going on in my reading world, if that’s just a tiny view of the future, we’re all in for quite a ride.

Mobile technology influence on Social Media

Posted on: December 8th, 2010 by admin-kablooey No Comments

After the article from Barrie Bramley on the influence of the smart phone I thought it would be a good idea to show you this infographic that outlines the effect of the mobile phone on social media.

 how-are-mobile-phones-changing-social-media_50290a6e052fa

What’s your digital lifestyle?

Posted on: December 1st, 2010 by admin-kablooey 6 Comments

I am a firm believer that every person hasa certian level of digital integration in their lifestyle. The is something in almost all of us that uses the digital landscape in someway or another. This is what excites me about digital media – its different for everyone.

Each person experiences the digital landscape in their own way, from their own vantage point and with their own personal agenda. This is the Consumer 2.0 I have spoken about before. I go into this in more detail in our presentation but I wanted to share a bit of insight into a study by TNS Surveys which outlines six digital lifestyles. These are:

INFLUENCERS

The internet is an integral part of my life. I’m young and a big mobile Internet user and generally access everywhere, all of the time. I’m a blogger, a passionate social networker with many social network friends. I’m also a big online shopper, even via my mobile. I want to make sure as many people as possible hear my online voice.

COMMUNICATORS

I just love talking and expressing myself, whether that’s face to face, on a fixed line, mobile or on social networking sites, instant messaging or just emailing people. I really want to express myself in the online world in the way that I can’t in the offline one. I tend to be a smart phone user and I’m connecting online from my mobile, at home, at work or at college.

KNOWLEDGE-SEEKERS

I use the internet to gain knowledge, information and to educate myself about the world. I’m not very interested in social networking but I do want to hear from like-minded people especially to help me make purchase decisions. I’m very interested in the latest thing.

NETWORKERS

The internet is important for me to establish and maintain relationships. I have a busy life whether it’s my profession or managing the home. I use things like social networking to keep in touch with people I wouldn’t have time to otherwise. I’m a big home internet home user and I’m very open to talking to brands and looking for promotions. That said I’m not really the kind of person to voice my opinions online.

ASPIRERS

I’m looking to create a personal space online. I’m very new to the Internet and I’m accessing via mobile and internet cafes but mostly from home. I’m not doing a great deal at the moment online but I’m desperate to do more of everything, especially from a mobile device.

FUNCTIONALS

The internet is a functional tool, I don’t want to express myself online. I like emailing, checking the news, sport & weather but also online shopping. I’m really not interested in anything new (like social networking )and I am worried about data privacy and security. I am older and have been using the internet for a long time.

Which one are you?

I would love to hear your comments on which digital lifestyle most described you. Feel free to comment. Thank you

Is your company website your best business to business marketing tool?

Posted on: November 24th, 2010 by admin-kablooey No Comments

Business to Business need lead generation focused websites

Business leaders, in a recent study, cited company websites as the main source of information when looking at a business to business purchase. Company websites were used more than trade magazines, search engines and social media.

The business decision makers are telling us the story that with big purchases they are definitely interested in browsing through a website to find out more about the product they are looking at purchasing. In business to business environments a company website has great potential to add to the sales leads and referrals for your sales team by ensuring that it utilises a strong lead generation strategy.

Interestingly enough, although the decision makers use company websites the most to gather information the decision maker is mainly influenced by word of mouth and social media channels. (more…)

Twitter, FaceBook and Social Media are just like a Fax Machine

Posted on: October 20th, 2010 by admin-kablooey 2 Comments

The interest in Social Media in the business world is growing. And it’s growing ‘upwards’ in the organisation. I say ‘upwards’ because increasingly I’m engaged in conversations with the Gate-Keepers around whether they should our shouldn’t jump in? The weight of the conversation is still resistance and skepticism, but new conversations are emerging in new places, and this for me, is a trend I’m interested in following.

When I am asked for my opinion as to whether a business should engage in Social Media, my response has become, “Did you buy a Fax Machine?”

Often I get a puzzled look before I’m asked to elaborate. My question comes from hours and hours of thinking, conversation and reflection around what this all means for business? And a few months ago it dawned on me, that the Social Media conversation is just like the Fax Machine conversation of years ago. In fact, I’ve discovered that in some companies the decision around a Fax Machine made it to the Board Meeting!

For those that can remember, the questions and concerns were very similar:

  • We’re doing fine without a fax machine
  • Who would we fax?
  • Who would fax us?
  • What would we fax?
  • Not all of our customers and suppliers have one?
  • I can’t see how it would make a difference to the way we work?
  • It’s going to create unnecessary expense
  • Will we have to create a Fax Department?

Of course we all know how the story played itself out. Fax machines became ubiquitous. Everyone got one. The peer pressure mounted. In fact, it got a stage where if you didn’t have one, it reflected negatively on your business,

And you could tell the same story around the Cell Phone and the Web Site. The same process, the same set of questions and ultimately the Gate-Keepers relented, embraced the new form of media and communication, and the rest, as they say, is history.

In fact, for many people the fax machine has come and gone. There are many young people today who’ve never received a fax, have never sent one, and probably will never touch a fax or fax machine ever in their life.

When you spend some time reflecting on the decision process and rationale of the Fax Machine, Social Media is easy to get your mind around. It’s simply another channel through which to engage with your customers and suppliers. There’s nothing more to it than that really. Certainly it needs a different set of skills and it will, like the fax machine, change some of how you do business.

Is it necessary? Absolutely. When your customers are using it to engage, at the level we’re seeing, it’s not only necessary it’s imperative. The real challenge in my opinion is not to try and build a case for embracing Social Media, I dare you to build a case against it. I can’t think of a single business or industry that is excluded from having to ‘jump in’!

Barrie deals with the topic of Social Media in the presentation, Beyond the Hype. If you’d like to download a pdf overview of the presentation, please click here. Or you can watch Barrie speaking about technology if you click here.

What the Chilean miners’ rescue tells us about online media consumption

Posted on: October 20th, 2010 by admin-kablooey 4 Comments

Wednesday October 13th, most of the world were watching with baited breath as the rescue mission started for thirty three Chilean miners trapped about 700 meters below the ground. All thirty three men are doing well and it seems that their only cause for concern would be dealing with the new found fame.

The media is always a good reflection of how an event captures the heart of people and this was no different. In fact this event caused a few social media records to break as people watched, followed and tweeted their support for the famous miners.

Chilean Rescue almost as popular as the Obama Election

Shortly after rescue operations announced they would start the rescue the next day (5pm on Tuesday the 12th October) traffic to online news websites surged to record the 5th largest spike in global news traffic since 2005.

online media consumption

Chilean miner rescue creates 5th largest global news traffic spike

One of the largest success factors to the increase in online media consumption has been the new technologies in streaming video of the event to online viewers. Essentially allowing CNN to broadcast 4.6 million live streams of the event. In addition this translated into 82.5 million page views on the website.

What was the social media impact?

(more…)

An Open Letter To Boomer Bosses Everywhere:

Posted on: October 20th, 2010 by Keith Coats 2 Comments

Dear Wally, (if the name fits or even if it doesn’t…)

I need to speak to you on an important issue.  For some time I have been watching a tsunami looming large on the horizon and it seems that the majority of corporate leaders I get to engage with remain oblivious to the impending danger.  It seems that they continue to believe that the impressive sand castles they have been building on the beach will remain untouched by this looming threat. They won’t.

May I suggest that, regardless of whatever name you go by, that for now you consider ‘Wally’ to be the name that fits best – and I will do the same. Whilst I don’t regard myself as some sort of contemporary Paul Revere, his mission certainly comes to mind as I write to you. Thankfully my means of getting the message out is not dependent on a horse (in his case several horses), my riding skills and ability to navigate the route. Yet, with the same urgency and earnestness of Mr. Revere I write to warn you of an impending danger to the way you live your business. And like Paul Revere, I hope that this too might contribute to a tipping point of awareness that saves the day!

For some time, many have peddled the attraction and retention of  ‘Talent’ as the most significant corporate strategic challenge. The ‘war for talent’, as originally framed by McKinsey’s, was as recently as last year verified as the number one challenge by a global survey and research project done by the Boston Consultancy Group. Of course, this agenda item has played out in different ways and forms depending on where exactly in the world Wally finds himself. This undoubtedly remains a significant strategic challenge and is fuelled by a generational demographic shift that needs to be understood if the threat is to be countered.

But it is not this challenge that I wish to warn you about, although the new threat is not entirely unrelated to the generational shift that is taking place. (more…)

How much Klout do you have on Twitter?

Posted on: August 11th, 2010 by admin-kablooey 4 Comments

I mainly use two online apps to run the Twitter accounts I run. And I use these two because they do very different things. There are some things I need to do from time to time where the one trumps the other, and visa versa for other things. So there’s no getting rid of either of them.

Anyway, a possibly meaningless introduction to Klout. It’s integrated into CoTweet, but you can get there without CoTweet (click here).

The Klout Score is the measurement of your overall online influence. The scores range from 0 to 100 with higher scores representing a wider and stronger sphere of influence. Klout uses over 25 variables to measure True Reach, Amplification Probability, and Network Score. The size of the sphere is calculated by measuring True Reach (engaged followers and friends vs. spam bots, dead accounts, etc.). Amplification Probability is the likelihood that messages will generate retweets or spark a conversation. If the user’s engaged followers are highly influential, they’ll have a high Network Score.

We believe that influence is the ability to drive people to action — “action” might be defined as a reply, a retweet or clicking on a link. We perform significant testing to ensure that the average click-through rate on links shared is highly correlated with a person’s Klout Score. The 25+ variables used to generate scores for each of these categories are normalized across the whole data set and run through our analytics engine. After the first pass of analytics, we apply a specific weight to each data point. We then run the factors through our machine-learning analysis and calculate the final Klout Score. The final Klout Score is a representation of how successful a person is at engaging their audience and how big of an impact their messages have on people.

I’ve enjoyed engaging with their system of measurement, simply because it goes beyond the usual measure of ‘how many followers’ I have? A friend, for example, who has three times as many followers on Twitter than I do, but our Klout Scores suggest I behave in a very different way to how he does, and because of that, according to Klout, I get a higher score.

Sometimes I smile when I look at what Klout feedbacks to me, because it sounds a little like a personality assessment based on my Twitter behaviour. Very flattering and all mushy and gooey. Who knows, perhaps this will even be a significant measure of who we are in  the future. Can it be any less accurate or definitive than some of the measures we use today? Maybe even an extra layer to be applied to the Talent Matrix being implemented inside of companies the world over? At least the feedback is objective, instant, and I know exactly what’s expected of me to move it  : ) But this is a conversation for another day…

Do we Twitter because we’re human, and are we human because we Twitter?

Posted on: August 3rd, 2010 by admin-kablooey No Comments

Last year I read ‘Born to Run‘. If you’re a runner, or would like to be, and haven’t read it, then do yourself a favour, it’s a goodie. At the end of the book the author suggests that Homo Sapiens made it to where we have because we’re runners. And then drops this line that I’ve not forgotten, “We run because we’re human, and we’re human because we run.” Running is part of who we all are, and we only got here because of our ability to run. We dare not stop running. It’s more than getting fat and unfit. It’s about holding onto our human-ess.

For those who’ve peeked at my writing this year, you’ll know I keep suggesting that it doesn’t matter if Twitter /FaceBook et al, lives or dies! The real question to be asking is whether it’s changing us? Changing how we engage, relate, interact, etc?

I think it’s a great perspective for companies to consider. While you’re panicking about getting into or staying out of Social Media, you better be asking whether it’s changing your customers?

Of course I don’t think Social Media has reached the kind of gravitas running has, in the context of talking about what makes us human, but I still do like thinking about the direction we’re all headed. This weekend I picked up this article from The New York Times Magazine – I Tweet, Therefore I Am. You understand why it got my attention : ) A title declaring the connection between our Humanness and Social Media. The author picks up on similar themes:

The expansion of our digital universe — Second Life, FacebookMySpace, Twitter — has shifted not only how we spend our time but also how we construct identity. For her coming book, “Alone Together,” Sherry Turkle, a professor at M.I.T., interviewed more than 400 children and parents about their use of social media and cellphones. Among young people especially she found that the self was increasingly becoming externally manufactured rather than internally developed: a series of profiles to be sculptured and refined in response to public opinion. “On Twitter or Facebook you’re trying to express something real about who you are,” she explained. “But because you’re also creating something for others’ consumption, you find yourself imagining and playing to your audience more and more. So those moments in which you’re supposed to be showing your true self become a performance. Yourpsychology becomes a performance.” Referring to “The Lonely Crowd,” the landmark description of the transformation of the American character from inner- to outer-directed, Turkle added, “Twitter is outer-directedness cubed.”

This for me is just another reflection. I don’t know where we’re headed yet? I don’t know if it’ll be good or bad for us? I don’t know if we’ll care? I do know it’s beginning to change some things. The NYT article suggests that ‘empathy’ may be a loser:

The risk of the performance culture, of the packaged self, is that it erodes the very relationships it purports to create, and alienates us from our own humanity. Consider the fate of empathy: in an analysis of 72 studies performed on nearly 14,000 college students between 1979 and 2009, researchers at the Institute for Social Research at theUniversity of Michigan found a drop in that trait, with the sharpest decline occurring since 2000. Social media may not have instigated that trend, but by encouraging self-promotion over self-awareness, they may well be accelerating it.

Let’s be careful out there. With each other and with ourselves. And perhaps, for now, don’t stop running : )

Do we Twitter because we're human, and are we human because we Twitter?

Posted on: August 3rd, 2010 by admin-kablooey No Comments

Last year I read ‘Born to Run‘. If you’re a runner, or would like to be, and haven’t read it, then do yourself a favour, it’s a goodie. At the end of the book the author suggests that Homo Sapiens made it to where we have because we’re runners. And then drops this line that I’ve not forgotten, “We run because we’re human, and we’re human because we run.” Running is part of who we all are, and we only got here because of our ability to run. We dare not stop running. It’s more than getting fat and unfit. It’s about holding onto our human-ess.

For those who’ve peeked at my writing this year, you’ll know I keep suggesting that it doesn’t matter if Twitter /FaceBook et al, lives or dies! The real question to be asking is whether it’s changing us? Changing how we engage, relate, interact, etc?

I think it’s a great perspective for companies to consider. While you’re panicking about getting into or staying out of Social Media, you better be asking whether it’s changing your customers?

Of course I don’t think Social Media has reached the kind of gravitas running has, in the context of talking about what makes us human, but I still do like thinking about the direction we’re all headed. This weekend I picked up this article from The New York Times Magazine – I Tweet, Therefore I Am. You understand why it got my attention : ) A title declaring the connection between our Humanness and Social Media. The author picks up on similar themes:

The expansion of our digital universe — Second Life, FacebookMySpace, Twitter — has shifted not only how we spend our time but also how we construct identity. For her coming book, “Alone Together,” Sherry Turkle, a professor at M.I.T., interviewed more than 400 children and parents about their use of social media and cellphones. Among young people especially she found that the self was increasingly becoming externally manufactured rather than internally developed: a series of profiles to be sculptured and refined in response to public opinion. “On Twitter or Facebook you’re trying to express something real about who you are,” she explained. “But because you’re also creating something for others’ consumption, you find yourself imagining and playing to your audience more and more. So those moments in which you’re supposed to be showing your true self become a performance. Yourpsychology becomes a performance.” Referring to “The Lonely Crowd,” the landmark description of the transformation of the American character from inner- to outer-directed, Turkle added, “Twitter is outer-directedness cubed.”

This for me is just another reflection. I don’t know where we’re headed yet? I don’t know if it’ll be good or bad for us? I don’t know if we’ll care? I do know it’s beginning to change some things. The NYT article suggests that ‘empathy’ may be a loser:

The risk of the performance culture, of the packaged self, is that it erodes the very relationships it purports to create, and alienates us from our own humanity. Consider the fate of empathy: in an analysis of 72 studies performed on nearly 14,000 college students between 1979 and 2009, researchers at the Institute for Social Research at theUniversity of Michigan found a drop in that trait, with the sharpest decline occurring since 2000. Social media may not have instigated that trend, but by encouraging self-promotion over self-awareness, they may well be accelerating it.

Let’s be careful out there. With each other and with ourselves. And perhaps, for now, don’t stop running : )

Social Media Platforms are taking the virtual out of reality

Posted on: May 25th, 2010 by admin-kablooey 1 Comment

Often those that don’t, a few that have, and one or two that do, criticize social media platforms (Twitter, FaceBook, et al) of being a conceptual experience robbing the depth of authenticity from face-to-face relationships. In their opinion relationships on social media platforms are a far cry from the real world and are therefore best avoided.

There is some merit in these pronouncements, especially with some of the bizarre and ridiculous anecdotes that abound in these emergent spaces. We all know the one about the one guy that murdered the other guy in the real world because he stole something from him in the virtual world. And we know about the woman who divorced her husband in the real world because of his affair in the virtual world.

But what of the other stories? The counter-stories to these crazy ones? Are there any, and if there are, what do they look like? Do they have substance? Do they add value? Do they benefit us individually or corporately?  That was the journey of discovery I set myself 2 weeks ago as I thought about writing this post.

If any social media platform is going to survive it will need to impact the real world we inhabit. It cannot remain conceptual and virtual and expect to be more than just a passing fad. ChatRoulette, in my opinion, is a good example of a social media platform that will not find a place in our near future. It will be one of those places you go and visit because you’ve heard about it, and having been, will tick it off and never go back again. Unless of course it finds a way to impact the real world. At this juncture I cannot imagine how?

Mid-morning three Sunday’s ago, I received a Tweet from someone I’ve not met face-to-face. Someone I’ve not spoken to voice-to-voice. Someone I’d not ever sent a fax, e-mail or sms to. She’s someone I’ve only ever sent 140 character bursts to, via Twitter. I know she’s married, has two children, grew up in East London, and works in marketing for one of South Africa’s large financial institutions. You can learn a lot through 140 character bursts over time.

Her tweet had me digging around on Google for people who had done real things through and because of virtual relationships and interactions on one or many of the available social platforms?

I found some of the well known stories. Stories like the Kogi Korean BBQ:

The Kogi truck is now a staple of the Los Angeles area, delivering quality Korean BBQ via truck to different areas of the city daily. Owner Mark Manguera knew it would take off, but he couldn’t figure out how to let his growing customer base know where the truck would be each night. What did he end up doing? You guessed it. Twitter. He tweets the truck’s locations and times throughout the day, letting hungry customers know where to get their fix. It’s worked out splendidly. Mark and his team serve about 800 people per stop and have 22,000 Twitter followers. Twitter address: @KogiBBQ

The problem is that stories like this one have reached ‘legend status’. We look at them with a sense of awe and pass quickly by because we see them as ‘one-offs’ and ‘lucky breaks’. I needed a story closer to home. One that I could imagine myself a part of?

Welcome to the Twitter Blanket Drive. The tweep who got it rolling was @MelanieMinnaar, and her tweet was simply attempting, in her own words, to get 10 friends together for coffee to gather some blankets for people not equipped to deal with the approaching South African winter. Well, that’s where the story began. And it’s a great story. Suddenly people, all sorts of people, climbed on board.

Andre Bruton registered www.twitterblanketdrive.co.za (his initiative) and designed a website for the project. He describes himself as:

IT Geek, trouble shooter

On the 29th of May there’s a TweetUp being held in 8 different cities in South Africa. People are gathering on that evening from 18:00 to meet each other in the ‘real world’ to have a few drinks and give a few blankets to the project. Each one of those venues has been arranged by people that Melanie had nothing to do with organising. These are people that believe in the project, wanted to participate, and arranged the venues and will host the events.

If you’d like to go, there’s not criteria outside of interest in the project and to bring and donate at least one blanket on the night. You can go to the ‘official website’ and RSVP with your Twitter username. And if you’re not on Twitter you don’t need to RSVP, just pitch up and say hi.

There are traditional media partners involved in some cities, and organisations in each city who will receive the blankets and distribute them once the event is over.

I’m not sure if it’s an urban legend or not, but word (I heard) in the Twittersphere is that at least one company is donating R10 000 to the cause?

This is a great example of ‘the virtual’ meeting ‘reality’ and impacting people. In my mind it not only illustrates the value of social networks but it furthers their foothold in how we do things together as we move into the future.

I had an opportunity to interview Melanie (via Skype) about her, at that point, 2.5 week experience of the TwitterBlanketDrive (#TBD). It’s an interesting interview. Not only because you get to hear the story from the source, but because there are some interesting lessons she’s learned on the way. Lessons about a new way of doing things. Lessons about control, lack of it, and how big things can happen in an unexpected way. I guess Malcolm Gladwell would simply point us to his book, The Tipping Point? And he’d be correct. This is a great tipping point story. Made all the more interesting by the channel that was used to tip it.

To listen to the interview with Melanie Minnaar around the Twitter Blanket Drive, please follow any one of these two links

  • Click here to subscribe to the iTunes TomorrowToday PodCast Feed
  • Click here to access the interview via the TomorrowToday PodCast RSS Feed

If you’d like to download this article as a PDF to read later or share with someone via e-mail, click here.


PodCast Update – The change driver of Technology from After Shock

Posted on: May 5th, 2010 by admin-kablooey No Comments

We’ve just added a new PodCast to the TomorrowToday feed.

We took an exert of Barrie Bramley, speaking at a Business Breakfast, talking about Technology, from TomorrowToday’s latest presentation called After Shock.

If you’d like to listen to this audio track please click on the following:

The challenge of multiple communication channels

Posted on: April 29th, 2010 by admin-kablooey No Comments

One of the challenges the internet has created is an unthinkable number of channels through which to broadcast. Of course none of us make use of every channel, but there is always someone using a channel we’re not. And so if you want to communicate to them the days of taking the attitude of ‘you just come to us’ is over. Chances are, because they’re not engaging with your channel is that they don’t even know about you. And so if you want to find them, you’ve got to insert yourself into their space. It doesn’t end there, because each channel requires a different format for your content. You don’t just write an article or record a podcast and hope it translates easily into each space. No! You’ve got to take whatever you start with and continually adjust it to whatever context you’re going to post it to.

And if you’re like me, then you’ve got a headache just thinking about the ‘how’ of taking your message to as many platforms as possible. What I have learned is that the ability to do this is getting easier and easier (in terms of tools available), and the more I learn about new channels the more competent I feel and become in my distribution efforts.

With that as a pre-amble, let me tell you about my latest adventure….

I took the e-zine article (Five Practical Steps to Retain Talent) that I produce for TomorrowTodayeach month (it gets sent to around 11 000 people via e-mail), posted it onto our blog, built a short presentation and built a video PodCast. The video file was then uploaded to iTunes andYouTube.

I don’t know if this sounds like a lot to you? It exhausted me. Took me 1.5 days to work it all out, learn new skills and get it all to a place I was reasonably happy with. Of course next time around it’ll take far less time and in my experience always better quality.

Here’s the video below from YouTube.

Twitter 10 Billion – quality not quantity

Posted on: March 5th, 2010 by admin-kablooey No Comments

In the last few hours the 10 billionth tweet was tweeted on Twitter. As one would imagine there was all kinds of hype and excitement, as Tweeps with the necesary skills attempted to predict the time it would happen, and I imagine even be ‘the one’?

My last tweet was 9999989724. Wild. Will be at 10 billion by next tweet. – @Scobleizer

… and then seconds later….

Yup, already hit 10 billion. My last tweet was 10000011727 so now we can get on with real news. – @Scobleizer

This morning when I woke up it was all over, and followed:

Twitter reaches 10 billion tweets. (2 artcles)http://bit.ly/cApU1O http://bit.ly/a7KKcD@MelanieMinnaar

…. to find who the Tweep was and what they Tweeted?

I’ll save you the pain of going along there yourself. Drumroll, the 10 billionth tweet on Twitter….. was a protected user, so the identity of the person is not known, and secondly because of that, nobody knows what they tweeted.

A complete let down. I’m not sure what I was expecting, but it felt like it should have been one of those moments. In hindsight I realise my expectations were way off the mark.

Here’s what it’s taught me….. Twitter is not about quantity. It’s all about quality. The 10 billiont tweet was a let-down because the quality was terrible. It also doesn’t matter how many people follow you, or how many you follow, if the quality is bad, the entire experience is bad.

Keith Coats, a colleague of mine, often quotes a mentor of his… “Worry not the size of the stage on which you will be called to perform, worry that you have something to say!”

Nuf Sed

When social media grows up… it will change everything

Posted on: March 4th, 2010 by Graeme Codrington 32 Comments

Download a copy of this article in PDF format – right click here. The contents of this article can be presented as a keynote or a workshop for your team – we call that “Beyond the Hype“. Contact our UK or South African offices to find out how.


Flattr this

PS – make sure you read the comments below this blog entry – we’re continually adding new case studies and examples, and there is some amazing stuff to see. Take your time – the future starts here.

Twitter recently hosted it’s billionth Tweet and Facebook had over 500 million users by the end of 2009, continuing its trend of doubling every nine months or so. It is difficult to continue to argue that social media is nothing more than a fad, and an increasing number of companies are starting to make use of these technologies.

But most of these companies are merely using social networks as a means to communicate (mainly with customers, but sometimes with staff as well) or to market their products and services. These are simple – and obvious – applications, and soon you’ll just be another voice in cacophony of online noise. Unfortunately, most “social media experts” focus only on these aspects of online social networking, and are overhyping the benefits and underemphasising the cultural shifts required for companies to truly benefit. They are missing a really important trend with huge implications for every organisation in every industry and sector.

The reason that social media has taken off so quickly is that it is more than a fad. It is, in fact, merely the technological expression of a values shift that has been taking place for a number of years. It will therefore be a shaping force in the world over the next decade. It might not be the answer to all your problems as many social media pundits are predicting. But it will definitely change everything, and more and more companies are starting to see the benefits it offers. A revolution awaits us.

You can hardly turn on a TV news channel or read a business magazine these days without being overwhelmed by requests to “follow my tweets”, “check out our blog” or “send us your videos”. Social media has gone mainstream. But most business users and organisations are treating it like a gimmick, and only gaining a fraction of the value they could. If they understood the true nature of what is happening, they’d know that social media is merely an expression of a deeper trend that has the potential to change everything. And they’d realise that the first companies to grasp this will have the opportunity to gain phenomenal competitive advantage in their industry. In fact, some companies have already started to do so.

Social Media 101

If you’ve missed this trend and are not sure what I’m talking about, here’s a quick primer: social media are the tools you can use to do social networking on the Internet. This involves connecting with other people, and sharing information with them digitally (yes, it’s just networking and connecting with others online). The most used tools are:

(more…)

Why you shouldn’t change your Twitter Profile Pic

Posted on: January 27th, 2010 by admin-kablooey 1 Comment

There are literally thousands of articles and opinions out there spelling out the ‘laws’ of how to use Twitter. If the authors of those articles were honest, they’d admit that those ‘so-called laws’ are really just opinions. Their opinions. How on earth can anyone claim, at this early stage in Twitter’s life, to have a list of irrefutable laws’?

This post falls into the opinion category then. An irrefutable opinion according to me : )

I’m on Twitter everyday. Several times a day. It’s become the biggest influence in my world when it comes to learning. I’ve come to trust the voices and thoughts of a group of people, many of whom I have never met, to share their insights in a variety of fields that interest me. Even some that don’t.

I follow aprox 400 people, and as I scroll through my Twitter feed on my iPhone (I use 4 different Twitter Apps) my most relied upon method of finding those people I really enjoy is through their Twitter Profile Pic. I imagine I should be using their usernames for this, but I don’t. I’m a picture person. I possibly should be using ‘Twitter Lists’? I don’t, I’m a picture person.

And so when someone updates their image I lose them in the noise of my stream. It sometimes can take me weeks to re-orientate myself to their new image.

And that’s my irrefutable opinion then. It’s also a plea to those interesting people I rely on everyday. Don’t change who you are. You don’t need to update your ‘image’. I’ve come to like and appreciate you just the way you are : )

P.S. While writing this I found a mildly amusing post on 10 types of Twitter Profile Avatars. Click here to see for yourself.

Death and Twitter make for a horrid exchange

Posted on: December 17th, 2009 by admin-kablooey 1 Comment

Yesterday, in South Africa, Manto Tshabalala Msimang died from a liver complication that had been plaguing her for some time now. She is a former health minister, and her time spent in that role was fraught with controversy because of her seeming lack of will to embrace ARV’s to treat HIV. Because of this stand, she has been accused of causing the death of thousands of South Africans. Some have even suggested she should be charged with crimes against humanity.

I think it’s important to note, especially in a South African context, that feelings about her were held by a cross-section of South Africa. The debate was fully inclusive and representative.

Yesterday as the news of her death began to seep into the media conversation (both non-non-traditional and non-traditional) Twitter began to heat up. There’s some speculation as to where it started? Just Curious does provide a view of the time-line and the heat generated by 5FM radio jock Gareth Cliff.

To get a view for yourself, see the search for ‘Manto’ on Twitter. Click here.

However you re-construct it, I was hit by some of the following:

  • Death is a human thing. It’s not owned by one culture or one people group. Who dares to say that one group does it better than another? It’s very human. It reminds us all that we too one day will enter into it’s domain (www.we’lldietoooneday.com). Showing death some respect, and compassion to the family of those who have lost is not only right, it’s human.
  • When someone dies, I find it pretty difficult to say anything to anyone. Silence seems to be not only an appropriate response, but the most gentle and caring. A hug, a gesture, just simply being present in the space of those who have just lost, seems to work best. It’s awkward, and it’s clumsy, but I find it works.
  • If you do decide to speak, what words are sufficient to speak into what has just happened? You can’t do it in a sentence. So you end up bumbling along making a whole lot sound like not much at all.

So when the news broke on Twitter, and some people put their views out there, it did become terribly messy. There was huge emotion surrounding Tshabalala Msimang when she was alive. Those emotions were all still there after she had died. You can imagine what people end up saying when all you have is 140 characters? It’s blunt, it’s raw, it’s so in your face. There’s no place to explain, expand only express and explete.

The conversation one day later is whether people were right or wrong to put their views out there? Gareth Cliff has become the poster child for who did it bad.

I do think the exploration should be shifted slightly. It’s not about whether people put their views out or not? That’s inevitable. It should rather be around the forums we use and the timing of our comments? Would it have hurt to hold a negative, critical view for a day or two in respect of the family (at the very least)? Is Twitter a good forum for putting out such strong and potentially damaging emotions and thoughts?

The forums we use and the timing to speak by are age old questions. But they do need to be re-discussed from time to time. Especially in a world in which communication channels and platforms are changing as fast as they are.

In a Web 2.0 world, business has it’s head buried firmly in the sand

Posted on: December 10th, 2009 by admin-kablooey 2 Comments

I’m curious. Curious about business’ lack of engagement with Twitter  / FaceBook / Tumblr / Google and everything else Web 2.0. I would have thought that any communication channel getting the sort of traction, focus, attention and subscription that these channels are getting, would have business engaging like a love struck teenager who’d just discovered their perfect partner?

But it’s not so. So not so. So far, the majority of my experience and observation is that business has been an extremely poor performer in these spaces. Take a look at these points from Jeffbulla’s Blog:

  1. 73 percent of Fortune 100 companies registered a total of 540 Twitter accounts.
  2. About three-quarters (76 percent) of those accounts did not post tweets very often.
  3. More than half (52 percent) were not actively engaged (This was measured by engagement metrics such as numbers of links, hashtags, references and retweets.)
  4. (more…)

In a Web 2.0 world, business has it's head buried firmly in the sand

Posted on: December 10th, 2009 by admin-kablooey 2 Comments

I’m curious. Curious about business’ lack of engagement with Twitter  / FaceBook / Tumblr / Google and everything else Web 2.0. I would have thought that any communication channel getting the sort of traction, focus, attention and subscription that these channels are getting, would have business engaging like a love struck teenager who’d just discovered their perfect partner?

But it’s not so. So not so. So far, the majority of my experience and observation is that business has been an extremely poor performer in these spaces. Take a look at these points from Jeffbulla’s Blog:

  1. 73 percent of Fortune 100 companies registered a total of 540 Twitter accounts.
  2. About three-quarters (76 percent) of those accounts did not post tweets very often.
  3. More than half (52 percent) were not actively engaged (This was measured by engagement metrics such as numbers of links, hashtags, references and retweets.)
  4. (more…)

The Twitter interview

Posted on: November 2nd, 2009 by Graeme Codrington No Comments

I was recently interviewed by a journalist on the issue of Twitter and social media, and how it might impact traditional media. It was a fairly focused interview – not broad ranging – but you might be interested in some of the thoughts that emerged.

Q1. How has Twitter changed the landscape of social networking?

A1. No, I don’t think so. Twitter is to online communication what text messages (SMSs) did to email. Because you’re only allowed 140 characters, you’re forced to be short, sharp and to the point (or, in many people’s cases: vague, confusing and silly). I think Twitter has added to an already growing trend towards social networking.

(more…)

How, when and why I Tweet and Blog

Posted on: October 16th, 2009 by Graeme Codrington 1 Comment

I’m often asked how I use social media, so I thought it might be helpful to do a quick blog about it. Not because you really care about me, but because it might help spark some thoughts about how you use social media and because it might help you get more out of this website and TomorrowToday’s other resources.

Firstly, then, this blog site. I use it as my filing cabinet for good ideas and good stuff I’ve seen. I focus on tracking trends that are shaping the new world of work, with a particular focus on demography and shifting societal values. But I’m also interested in the impact of other major forces, such as technology, institutional shifts, the environment and ethical consumption. I use this blog as a way of capturing case studies, ideas, trends and especially for writing up bits and pieces that I can later use in longer articles, white papers and books. The categories on the right hand side are linked to existing and expected frameworks (which we use as presentations or workshops with our clients).

As an author, I try and keep a discipline of writing about 200-400 words every day. Sometimes these words are rubbish – those are filed in fragmentary documents on my hard drive. Sometimes they start something that then inspires me to develop an article length entry – most recently, for example, I wrote a monster entry about Good to Great – that took nearly a week to complete. But every now and again, the 200-400 words produce a great thought – and that becomes a blog entry. My aim is one of these every other day.

Our blog has an automatic widget that then reports the new blog entry on Twitter (the feed is at @tomorrowtodayza). I wait about 30 minutes and then Retweet that auto notice using my own Twitter account (@codrington).

(more…)

Stop Tweeting about these…

Posted on: October 12th, 2009 by admin-kablooey No Comments

Had to smile as this post from The Oatmeal this morning. It it Monday morning, and if anything it’s bound to give you a little smile. 10 Things you need to stop Tweeting about.

It’s a large and often question I’m hearing these days: what is Twitter all about? I’ve got it down to 3 categories of Tweets in order to explain it:

  • The ‘I’m having a shower’ crew
  • The ‘I’m at a conference/church meeting and this is what going on’ gang
  • The ‘I’ve just read this great blog post, and you should too’ group

Or put another way:

  • What I’M doing tweets
  • What WE’RE doing tweets
  • What YOU SHOULD be doing tweets

They all seem to have their own following based on the people I followers. There are some that cross over, but most people seem to stick to one particular genre.

Of course there are the ‘do business with me / look at my sexy profile online’ folk. But they’re despicable, in my opinion, and simply shouldn’t be allowed on Twitter. They do have a right to play with the rest of us, but it’s a pain in the butt to have to look at their tweets when I’m looking for something to feed my soul.

And yes, for some of you reading this, what and who I discover on Twitter does feed my soul : )

Mom’s are big

Posted on: September 17th, 2009 by admin-kablooey No Comments

Every now and then I discover thoughts from marketing experts exploring the value of women between 35-55 and in this example mom’s. Their research and observations remind the marketplace of the value of the people who match the criteria of these segments, and how over-looked they are from a marketing and communication perspective. They either have incredible spending power, or massive decision rights in their world, or are inhabiting a particular channel that isn’t effectively communicating to them.

The Israeli Diamond Industry web site has an article around social media and mothers titled, ‘Mothers use FaceBook, Twitter, Blogs more than average adults’, and again suggests the retail world is missing a trick if they’re not using these platforms to speak to them.

“Retailers who aren’t engaging customers through social media could be missing the boat. Twitter, Facebook and blogs are becoming increasingly popular with moms as they search for coupons or deals and keep in touch with loved ones. The web provides efficient, convenient ways for brands to stay in front of their most loyal shoppers and attract new ones.”

I am always left wondering if these segments have been overlooked for so long is it because there isn’t an effective way to single them out, or is it because companies aren’t wired to see them. Reminds me of that quote that goes something like this, “Do we look at what we see, or do we see what we look at?”

Mom's are big

Posted on: September 17th, 2009 by admin-kablooey No Comments

Every now and then I discover thoughts from marketing experts exploring the value of women between 35-55 and in this example mom’s. Their research and observations remind the marketplace of the value of the people who match the criteria of these segments, and how over-looked they are from a marketing and communication perspective. They either have incredible spending power, or massive decision rights in their world, or are inhabiting a particular channel that isn’t effectively communicating to them.

The Israeli Diamond Industry web site has an article around social media and mothers titled, ‘Mothers use FaceBook, Twitter, Blogs more than average adults’, and again suggests the retail world is missing a trick if they’re not using these platforms to speak to them.

“Retailers who aren’t engaging customers through social media could be missing the boat. Twitter, Facebook and blogs are becoming increasingly popular with moms as they search for coupons or deals and keep in touch with loved ones. The web provides efficient, convenient ways for brands to stay in front of their most loyal shoppers and attract new ones.”

I am always left wondering if these segments have been overlooked for so long is it because there isn’t an effective way to single them out, or is it because companies aren’t wired to see them. Reminds me of that quote that goes something like this, “Do we look at what we see, or do we see what we look at?”

Guy Kawasaki on how he Tweets

Posted on: July 6th, 2009 by admin-kablooey No Comments

Anyone who follows @guykawasaki on Twitter assumes the man never sleeps. We’re all certain that Tweeting isn’t his main job, but he never seems to stop tweeting. So how does he do it?

Click over to ‘How to Change the World‘ for an interview with Guy, that I certainly enjoyed reading. Well actually it looks like it’s an interview with Guy by Guy?

Clearly he’s doesn’t mess around : )

“Yes, four people contribute to my tweets: Annie Colbert, Gina Ruiz, Noelle Chun, and Neenz Faleafine. This is why you will see the initials “AC, “GR,” “NC,” and “LF” at the end of some tweets. If there are no initials, then it’s me.